Urban Engineering for Sustainability

by Derrible

ISBN: 9780262043441 | Copyright 2019

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A textbook that introduces integrated, sustainable design of urban infrastructures, drawing on civil engineering, environmental engineering, urban planning, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer science.

This textbook introduces urban infrastructure from an engineering perspective, with an emphasis on sustainability. Bringing together both fundamental principles and practical knowledge from civil engineering, environmental engineering, urban planning, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer science, the book transcends disciplinary boundaries by viewing urban infrastructures as integrated networks.

The text devotes a chapter to each of five engineering systems—electricity, water, transportation, buildings, and solid waste—covering such topics as fundamentals, demand, management, technology, and analytical models. Other chapters present a formal definition of sustainability; discuss population forecasting techniques; offer a history of urban planning, from the Neolithic era to Kevin Lynch and Jane Jacobs; define and discuss urban metabolism and infrastructure integration, reviewing system interdependencies; and describe approaches to urban design that draw on complexity theory, algorithmic models, and machine learning. Throughout, a hypothetical city state, Civitas, is used to explain and illustrate the concepts covered. Each chapter includes working examples and problem sets. An appendix offers tables, diagrams, and conversion factors. The book can be used in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in civil engineering and as a reference for practitioners. It can also be helpful in preparation for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) exams.

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Contents (pg. vii)
Preface (pg. xv)
Acknowledgments (pg. xxi)
I. Urban Contexts and Sustainability (pg. 1)
1. Introduction (pg. 3)
1.1 On the Path to Scenario B (pg. 4)
1.2 Objective: Integrate Infrastructure Networks (pg. 5)
1.3 Why Cities? (pg. 8)
1.4 Civitas (pg. 10)
1.5 Book Outline (pg. 12)
1.6 Measures and Units (pg. 13)
1.7 Missing Topics (pg. 17)
1.8 Conclusion (pg. 18)
Problem Set (pg. 19)
Notes (pg. 20)
References (pg. 21)
2. Sustainability (pg. 23)
2.1 Defining Sustainability (pg. 24)
2.2 Sustainability Principles (pg. 33)
2.3 The Triple Bottom Line of Sustainability (pg. 36)
2.4 The IPAT Equation and the Kaya Identity (pg. 39)
2.5 Planetary Boundaries and Nonlinearities (pg. 42)
2.6 Conclusion (pg. 46)
Problem Set (pg. 47)
Notes (pg. 50)
References (pg. 51)
3. Population (pg. 53)
3.1 Malthus and an Essay on the Principle of Population (pg. 55)
3.2 Short-Term Population Predictions (pg. 59)
3.3 Long-Term Population Predictions (pg. 65)
3.4 The Cohort-Survival Method (pg. 69)
3.5 Conclusion (pg. 72)
Problem Set (pg. 77)
Notes (pg. 82)
References (pg. 83)
4. Urban Planning (pg. 85)
4.1 A Brief History of Urban Planning (pg. 88)
4.2 Essentials of Urban Planning (pg. 103)
4.3 Urban Design and Desirable Traits (pg. 111)
4.4 Conclusion (pg. 117)
Problem Set (pg. 120)
Notes (pg. 121)
References (pg. 122)
II. Urban Engineering and Infrastructure Systems (pg. 125)
5. Electricity (pg. 127)
5.1 Fundamentals of Electricity (pg. 129)
5.2 Electricity Demand (pg. 145)
5.3 Electricity Generation (pg. 151)
5.4 Future Grid (pg. 171)
5.5 Conclusion (pg. 174)
Problem Set (pg. 175)
Notes (pg. 180)
References (pg. 182)
6. Water (pg. 185)
6.1 Fundamentals of Water Resources Engineering (pg. 187)
6.1.2 Flow in Closed Conduits (pg. 194)
6.1.3 Flow in Open Channels (pg. 203)
6.1.4 Groundwater Engineering (pg. 208)
6.2 Water Demand (pg. 213)
6.3 Water and Wastewater Treatment (pg. 220)
6.4 Stormwater Management (pg. 223)
6.5 Energy Use in Water (pg. 237)
6.6 Conclusion (pg. 241)
Problem Set (pg. 242)
Notes (pg. 248)
References (pg. 251)
7. Transport (pg. 253)
7.1 Fundamentals of Transport (pg. 255)
7.2 Travel Demand (pg. 275)
7.3 Transport and Land Use (pg. 290)
7.5 Conclusion (pg. 306)
Problem Set (pg. 308)
Notes (pg. 316)
References (pg. 318)
8. Buildings (pg. 321)
8.1 Fundamentals of Thermal Comfort and Heat Transfer (pg. 324)
8.2 Energy Demand in Buildings (pg. 351)
8.3 Building Design and Technology Recommendations (pg. 359)
8.4 Conclusion (pg. 372)
Problem Set (pg. 373)
Notes (pg. 379)
References (pg. 380)
9. Solid Waste (pg. 383)
9.1 Fundamentals of Solid Waste Management (pg. 386)
9.2 Solid Waste Generation and Composition (pg. 411)
9.3 Solid Waste Disposal (pg. 432)
9.3.3 Solid Waste Disposal (pg. 442)
9.4 Conclusion (pg. 449)
Problem Set (pg. 451)
Notes (pg. 457)
References (pg. 459)
III. Urban Metabolism and Novel Approaches (pg. 461)
10. Urban Metabolism and Infrastructure Integration (pg. 463)
10.1 Urban Metabolism (pg. 465)
10.2 Infrastructure Interdependencies (pg. 485)
10.3 Integrating and Decentralizing Urban Infrastructure Systems (pg. 500)
10.4 Conclusion (pg. 510)
Problem Set (pg. 512)
Notes (pg. 518)
References (pg. 520)
11. Science of Cities and Machine Learning (pg. 523)
11.1 The Science of Cities (pg. 525)
11.2 Machine Learning (pg. 551)
11.3 Conclusion (pg. 568)
Problem Set (pg. 572)
Notes (pg. 579)
References (pg. 582)
12. Conclusion (pg. 585)
12.1 Three Paradigm-Shifting Changes (pg. 587)
12.2 Final Thoughts and the Four-Step Urban Infrastructure Design Process (pg. 598)
Problem Set (pg. 600)
Notes (pg. 601)
References (pg. 602)
Appendix (pg. 605)
A. Tables (pg. 605)
B. Moody Diagram (pg. 611)
C. Level-of-Service Diagram (pg. 612)
D. Equation Sheet (pg. 614)
Index (pg. 629)

Sybil Derrible Derrible

Sybil Derrible is Associate Professor in the Civil and Materials Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he is also Director of the Complex and Sustainable Urban Networks Laboratory, and Research Associate Professor in the Institute of Environmental Science and Policy.

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