Practical Finance for Operations and Supply Chain Management

by Serrano, Lekkakos

ISBN: 9780262043595 | Copyright 2020

Click here to preview

Instructor Requests

Digital Exam/Desk Copy Print Desk Copy Ancillaries
Tabs

An introduction to financial tools and concepts from an operations perspective, addressing finance/operations trade-offs and explaining financial accounting, working capital, investment analysis, and more.

Students and practitioners in engineering and related areas often lack the basic understanding of financial tools and concepts necessary for a career in operations or supply chain management. This book offers an introduction to finance fundamentals from an operations perspective, enabling operations and supply chain professionals to develop the skills necessary for interacting with finance people at a practical level and for making sound decisions when confronted by tradeoffs between operations and finance. Readers will learn about the essentials of financial statements, valuation tools, and managerial accounting.

The book first discusses financial accounting, explaining how to create and interpret balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements, and introduces the idea of operating working capital—a key concept developed in subsequent chapters. The book then covers financial forecasting, addressing such topics as sustainable growth and the liquidity/profitability tradeoff; concepts in managerial accounting, including variable versus fixed costs, direct versus indirect costs, and contribution margin; tools for investment analysis, including net present value and internal rate of return; creation of value through operating working capital, inventory management, payables, receivables, and cash; and such strategic and tactical tradeoffs as offshoring versus local and centralizing versus decentralizing. The book can be used in undergraduate and graduate courses and as a reference for professionals. No previous knowledge of finance or accounting is required.

Expand/Collapse All
Contents (pg. vii)
Foreword (pg. xv)
Preface (pg. xvii)
Acknowledgments (pg. xxi)
1. Introduction: Finance Is Important, Even to You (pg. 1)
1.1 The Archetypal Case of Zara�������������������������������������� (pg. 1)
1.2 The Imperative Need to Understand Finance���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 2)
1.3 Impact of Operational Events on Firms’ Value���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 4)
1.4 The State of the Practice������������������������������������ (pg. 4)
1.5 A Final Caveat: Try to Look Past the Jargon���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 6)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 7)
2. Financial Accounting (pg. 9)
2.1 Origins������������������ (pg. 9)
2.2 Goals���������������� (pg. 11)
2.3 Limitations���������������������� (pg. 11)
2.4 Audience������������������� (pg. 13)
2.5 Elements������������������� (pg. 13)
2.5.1 The Firm��������������������� (pg. 14)
2.5.2 Trade Partners��������������������������� (pg. 14)
2.5.3 Value������������������ (pg. 14)
2.5.4 Risk����������������� (pg. 15)
2.5.5 Standards���������������������� (pg. 16)
2.5.6 Basic Accounting Principles���������������������������������������� (pg. 17)
2.5.7 Stocks and Flows����������������������������� (pg. 18)
2.5.8 Financial Statements��������������������������������� (pg. 19)
2.6 Moral Hazard and Adverse Selection Motives����������������������������������������������������& (pg. 20)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 20)
3. Accounting Mechanics and the Balance Sheet: The Basics (pg. 23)
3.1 Sharon the Shareholder��������������������������������� (pg. 23)
3.1.1 Brute-Force Approach��������������������������������� (pg. 24)
3.1.2 Pacioli’s Basic Approach������������������������������������� (pg. 25)
3.1.3 Pacioli’s Refined Approach (June) (pg. 31)
3.1.4 Pacioli’s Refined Approach (July and August) (pg. 43)
3.2 Summary������������������ (pg. 49)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 49)
4. Accounting Mechanics and the Balance Sheet: Additional Topics (pg. 51)
4.1 Ethan and Ryan’s New Firm������������������������������������ (pg. 51)
4.1.1 Recording the Firm’s Events until January 8���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 52)
4.1.2 Preparing the Balance Sheet as of January 8���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 56)
4.1.3 Recording the Firm’s Events until January 31���������������������������������������������������& (pg. 58)
4.1.4 Preparing the Balance Sheet as of January 31���������������������������������������������������& (pg. 65)
4.2 The Seven-Item Balance Sheet��������������������������������������� (pg. 66)
4.3 Understanding Amazon’s Balance Sheet����������������������������������������������� (pg. 72)
4.4 Summary������������������ (pg. 76)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 76)
5. Operating Working Capital (pg. 79)
5.1 Minimum Cash and Excess Cash��������������������������������������� (pg. 79)
5.2 Operating Working Capital and the Financial Balance Sheet������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 80)
5.2.1 Discussion: OWC Behavior������������������������������������� (pg. 83)
5.3 Operations Cycle and the Cash-to-Cash Cycle���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 85)
5.3.1 Accounts Receivable�������������������������������� (pg. 86)
5.3.2 Accounts Payable����������������������������� (pg. 86)
5.3.3 Inventory���������������������� (pg. 87)
5.3.4 OWC Stock and Flows Connections�������������������������������������������� (pg. 88)
5.4 Why Does Your CFO Go Crazy about OWC? (pg. 89)
5.5 Operating Working Capital and Working Capital���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 90)
5.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 93)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 93)
6. Measuring Shareholders’ Happiness: The Income Statement (pg. 95)
6.1 Definition��������������������� (pg. 95)
6.2 Elements������������������� (pg. 96)
6.3 OPEX and CAPEX������������������������� (pg. 100)
6.3.1 OPEX����������������� (pg. 100)
6.3.2 CAPEX������������������ (pg. 101)
6.4 Interpretation������������������������� (pg. 101)
6.5 Example: Understanding Toyota’s Income Statement��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 102)
6.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 104)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 104)
7. Tracking Money Changes: The Statement of Cash Flows (pg. 109)
7.1 Definition and Derivation������������������������������������ (pg. 109)
7.1.1 Funds from Operations and Cash Generated from Operations (pg. 110)
7.1.2 Algebraic Derivation��������������������������������� (pg. 111)
7.1.3 Common-Sense Derivation������������������������������������ (pg. 112)
7.2 The Seven-Item Statement of Cash Flows������������������������������������������������� (pg. 113)
7.3 Ethan and Ryan’s New Firm Revisited���������������������������������������������� (pg. 115)
7.3.1 Derivation����������������������� (pg. 115)
7.3.2 Interpretation and OWC Breakdown��������������������������������������������� (pg. 117)
7.4 Calculating the Level of New Investments��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 118)
7.5 Reconciliation of Statement of Cash Flows���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 118)
7.5.1 Example: Understanding Tata Motors’ Statement of Cash Flows (pg. 119)
7.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 122)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 122)
8. Accounting for Inventory (pg. 125)
8.1 Inventory Valuation in Retailing and Manufacturing��������������������������������������������������& (pg. 125)
8.2 Product Costing�������������������������� (pg. 129)
8.2.1 Use of Activity-Based Costing (ABC) Principles for Allocating Overhead (pg. 133)
8.2.2 Inventory Valuation Debate: Absorption versus Direct Costing (pg. 138)
8.3 Inventory Cost Flow Assumptions������������������������������������������ (pg. 141)
8.3.1 Specific Identification������������������������������������ (pg. 143)
8.3.2 Standard Costing Method������������������������������������ (pg. 144)
8.3.3 Average Cost Flow Assumption����������������������������������������� (pg. 145)
8.3.4 First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Assumption�������������������������������������������������� (pg. 146)
8.3.5 Last-In, First-Out (LIFO) Assumption������������������������������������������������� (pg. 147)
8.4 Application of Cost Flow Assumption in Manufacturing Firms (pg. 150)
8.5 Inventory Write-Offs and Its Impact on the Firm’s Value (pg. 153)
8.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 156)
8.7 Suggested Reading���������������������������� (pg. 156)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 156)
9. Interpreting Financial Statements for Operations (pg. 161)
9.1 More Intuitive Financial Statements���������������������������������������������� (pg. 162)
9.1.1 Visual Balance Sheet��������������������������������� (pg. 162)
9.1.2 Visual Income Statement������������������������������������ (pg. 164)
9.1.3 Visual Statement of Cash Flows������������������������������������������� (pg. 166)
9.2 Financial Ratios��������������������������� (pg. 167)
9.2.1 Why Financial Ratios��������������������������������� (pg. 168)
9.2.2 Overall Performance Ratios (CEO) (pg. 169)
9.2.3 Operational Performance Ratios (COO) (pg. 176)
9.2.4 Financial Performance Ratios (CFO) (pg. 189)
9.3 Breaking Down and Combining Ratios��������������������������������������������� (pg. 193)
9.3.1 ROE Breakdown�������������������������� (pg. 193)
9.3.2 GMROI Breakdown���������������������������� (pg. 195)
9.3.3 ROA Breakdown�������������������������� (pg. 196)
9.3.4 Relationship between ROE and RONA���������������������������������������������� (pg. 197)
9.3.5 Further Breakdown of Ratios���������������������������������������� (pg. 198)
9.4 Using Ratios to Obtain Information from Financial Statements (pg. 198)
9.4.1 Groupe Casino�������������������������� (pg. 200)
9.4.2 Who Is Who? (pg. 202)
9.5 Final Words on the Use of Ratios������������������������������������������� (pg. 205)
9.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 207)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 207)
10. Financial Forecasting (pg. 211)
10.1 Pro Forma Financial Statements������������������������������������������ (pg. 212)
10.1.1 Evaluating Bathline’s Performance����������������������������������������������� (pg. 214)
10.1.2 Estimating Bathline’s Financing Needs��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 219)
10.2 Sustainable Growth������������������������������ (pg. 221)
10.3 Financial Planning at Bathline Inc. (pg. 223)
10.4 Summary������������������� (pg. 227)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 227)
11. Tools to Improve Operating Margin: Introduction to Cost Accounting (pg. 231)
11.1 Simple Cost Taxonomies���������������������������������� (pg. 232)
11.1.1 Variable and Fixed Costs�������������������������������������� (pg. 232)
11.1.2 Direct and Indirect Costs��������������������������������������� (pg. 234)
11.2 Contribution Margin and Break-Even���������������������������������������������� (pg. 234)
11.3 Decisions at Capacity��������������������������������� (pg. 239)
11.3.1 Decisions at Capacity: An Enlightening Exercise��������������������������������������������������& (pg. 239)
11.3.2 Maximizing Profit Using Linear Programming���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 242)
11.3.3 Some Tips on Bottlenecks�������������������������������������� (pg. 243)
11.4 Unleashing the Power of Contribution Margin���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 244)
11.5 Improving Makepad’s Decisions Using Activity-Based Costing (pg. 248)
11.6 Summary������������������� (pg. 252)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 252)
12. Operations Investment Assessment: The Basics (pg. 257)
12.1 Introduction������������������������ (pg. 257)
12.2 Net Present Value����������������������������� (pg. 258)
12.2.1 Example: Calculating Net Present Value���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 263)
12.3 Internal Rate of Return (IRR) (pg. 271)
12.4 Selecting the Best Project�������������������������������������� (pg. 273)
12.5 Other Methods to Value Investments���������������������������������������������� (pg. 274)
12.5.1 Payback Period���������������������������� (pg. 275)
12.5.2 Economic Value Added (EVA) (pg. 275)
12.6 Summary������������������� (pg. 276)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 276)
13. Operations Investment Assessment: Some Refinements (pg. 283)
13.1 Introduction������������������������ (pg. 283)
13.2 Estimating the Discount Rate���������������������������������������� (pg. 283)
13.2.1 The Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) (pg. 284)
13.2.2 The Marginal Cost of Debt��������������������������������������� (pg. 285)
13.3 Is NPV Always a Valid Quantitative Measure? (pg. 285)
13.4 NPV Distributions����������������������������� (pg. 288)
13.5 Real Options������������������������ (pg. 291)
13.5.1 Option to Delay����������������������������� (pg. 293)
13.5.2 Option to Abandon������������������������������� (pg. 297)
13.5.3 Option to Expand������������������������������ (pg. 298)
13.5.4 Flexible Capacity Option�������������������������������������� (pg. 302)
13.6 NPV Is Not a Panacea: Deciding beyond the Numbers��������������������������������������������������& (pg. 304)
13.7 Roche: The Investment Decision Dilemma�������������������������������������������������� (pg. 305)
13.8 Summary������������������� (pg. 315)
13.9 Suggested Reading����������������������������� (pg. 316)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 316)
14. Managing Operating Working Capital (pg. 319)
14.1 Why Managing OWC Is Important����������������������������������������� (pg. 319)
14.2 Reducing Inventory������������������������������ (pg. 323)
14.2.1 Passing Inventory to Suppliers and Customers (pg. 323)
14.2.2 Consignment������������������������� (pg. 324)
14.2.3 Vendor-Managed Inventory�������������������������������������� (pg. 324)
14.3 Reducing Accounts Receivable���������������������������������������� (pg. 327)
14.3.1 Sales Discount���������������������������� (pg. 327)
14.3.2 Receivables Discounting and Factoring��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 329)
14.4 Increasing Accounts Payable��������������������������������������� (pg. 329)
14.4.1 Trade Credit�������������������������� (pg. 330)
14.4.2 Reverse Factoring������������������������������� (pg. 330)
14.5 Managing Cash������������������������� (pg. 331)
14.5.1 Improving the Cash Profile���������������������������������������� (pg. 331)
14.5.2 Coming Up with the Minimum Cash Level��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 333)
14.6 Is There an Optimal Level for OWC? (pg. 334)
14.7 Summary������������������� (pg. 336)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 337)
15. Solving Operations and Supply Chain Trade-Offs (pg. 339)
15.1 Offshoring versus Local Sourcing (pg. 339)
15.2 Financial Considerations in Global Supply Chain Design (pg. 348)
15.3 Broad versus Narrow Product Assortment�������������������������������������������������� (pg. 353)
15.3.1 SKU Rationalization��������������������������������� (pg. 359)
15.4 Other Operational Risk Pooling Strategies����������������������������������������������������& (pg. 361)
15.5 Push versus Pull���������������������������� (pg. 365)
15.6 Chasing versus Leveling����������������������������������� (pg. 370)
15.6.1 Financial Planning at BeerCo������������������������������������������ (pg. 372)
15.6.2 Switching from Chase to Level Production at BeerCo (pg. 376)
15.6.3 Cash Budgeting���������������������������� (pg. 379)
15.7 The Supply Chain Trade-Off Triangle (pg. 382)
15.8 Summary������������������� (pg. 386)
15.9 Suggested Reading����������������������������� (pg. 386)
Exercises���������������� (pg. 386)
Appendix A: The Triple-Seven Financial Statements (pg. 391)
Appendix B: Probability Review (pg. 393)
B.1 The Concept of Random Variable and Its Characterization������������������������������������������������� (pg. 393)
B.1.1 Random Variable���������������������������� (pg. 393)
B.1.2 The Probability Mass Function (pmf) and Probability Density Function (pdf) (pg. 393)
B.1.3 The Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) (pg. 395)
B.2 The Normal Distribution���������������������������������� (pg. 396)
B.2.1 Characterization of the Normal Distribution���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 396)
B.2.2 The Standard Normal Distribution and the z-score��������������������������������������������������& (pg. 399)
B.3 Central Limit Theorem�������������������������������� (pg. 401)
B.3.1 An Insightful Experiment������������������������������������� (pg. 401)
B.3.2 The Central Limit Theorem (CLT) (pg. 402)
B.4 Measures of Location and Variability for Continuous Random Variables (pg. 405)
B.4.1 Expectation of a Continuous Random Variable���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 405)
B.4.2 Covariance of Two Continuous Random Variables��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 405)
B.4.3 Variance and Standard Deviation of a Continuous Random Variable (pg. 406)
B.4.4 Coecient of Variation of a Random Variable��������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 407)
B.5 The Concept of Conditional Probability: Two Useful Theorems������������������������������������������������ (pg. 407)
B.5.1 The Concept of Conditional Probability��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 407)
B.5.2 Theorems of Total Expectation and Total Variance��������������������������������������������������& (pg. 407)
Appendix C: Inventory Management Review (pg. 411)
C.1 The Economic Order Quantity Formula���������������������������������������������� (pg. 411)
C.2 Newsvendor Model��������������������������� (pg. 413)
C.3 Safety Inventory in Multi-Period Replenishment Settings������������������������������������������������� (pg. 417)
C.3.1 The Continuous (r,Q) Policy (pg. 417)
C.3.2 The Periodic (R, S) Policy (pg. 418)
C.4 Risk Pooling����������������������� (pg. 419)
Glossary (pg. 423)
Index (pg. 435)
Alejandro Serrano

Alejandro Serrano

Alejandro Serrano is Professor of Supply Chain Management at the MIT–Zaragoza International Logistics Program, Lecturer at IESE Business School, and Research Affiliate at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics.

Spyros D. Lekkakos

Spyros D. Lekkakos

Spyros D. Lekkakos is Assistant Professor at the MIT–Zaragoza International Logistics Program and Research Affiliate at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics.

Instructors
You must have an instructor account and submit a request to access instructor materials for this book.
eTextbook
Go paperless today! Available online anytime, nothing to download or install.

Features

  • Bookmarking
  • Note taking
  • Highlighting