Language Acquisition and Development

A Generative Introduction

by Becker, Deen

ISBN: 9780262043588 | Copyright 2020

Click here to preview

Instructor Requests

Digital Exam/Desk Copy Print Desk Copy Ancillaries
Tabs

An introduction to the study of children's language development that provides a uniquely accessible perspective on generative/universal grammar–based approaches.

How children acquire language so quickly, easily, and uniformly is one of the great mysteries of the human experience. The theory of Universal Grammar suggests that one reason for the relative ease of early language acquisition is that children are born with a predisposition to create a grammar. This textbook offers an introduction to the study of children's acquisition and development of language from a generative/universal grammar–based theoretical perspective, providing comprehensive coverage of children's acquisition while presenting core concepts crucial to understanding generative linguistics more broadly.

After laying the theoretical groundwork, including consideration of alternative frameworks, the book explores the development of the sound system of language—children's perception and production of speech sound; examines how words are learned (lexical semantics) and how words are formed (morphology); investigates sentence structure (syntax), including argument structure, functional structure, and tense; considers such “nontypical” circumstances as acquiring a first language past infancy and early childhood, without the abilities to hear or see, and with certain cognitive disorders; and studies bilingual language acquisition, both simultaneously and in sequence.

Each chapter offers a summary section, suggestions for further reading, and exercises designed to test students' understanding of the material and provide opportunities to practice analyzing children's language. Appendixes provide charts of the International Phonetic Alphabet (with links to websites that allow students to listen to the sounds associated with these symbols) and a summary of selected experimental methodologies.

Expand/Collapse All
Contents (pg. v)
Acknowledgments (pg. xi)
I. Module 1: Language Acquisition in Theoretical Context (pg. 1)
1. Introduction: What Is Language Acquisition? (pg. 3)
1.1 The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 3)
1.2 The Developmental Problem of Language Acquisition��������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 9)
1.3 Overview of Chapters������������������������������� (pg. 10)
1.4 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 13)
1.5 References��������������������� (pg. 13)
2. Theoretical Approaches to Studying Language Acquisition (pg. 15)
2.1 Universal Grammar���������������������������� (pg. 16)
2.2 Statistical Tracking������������������������������� (pg. 35)
2.3 Modern Constructivist Approaches������������������������������������������� (pg. 39)
2.4 How Does Constructivism Differ from the UG-Based Approach? (pg. 45)
2.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 47)
2.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 48)
2.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 48)
2.8 References��������������������� (pg. 50)
II. Module 2: Building a Sound System (pg. 53)
3. Early Speech Perception (pg. 55)
3.1 Speech Sound Discrimination�������������������������������������� (pg. 57)
3.2 Perceiving Phonemic Contrasts���������������������������������������� (pg. 63)
3.3 Finding Word Boundaries: Speech Segmentation���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 66)
3.4 Summary������������������ (pg. 73)
3.5 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 73)
3.6 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 74)
3.7 References��������������������� (pg. 75)
4. Speech Production and Phonological Development (pg. 79)
4.1 When Are Vocalizations Part of Language? (pg. 79)
4.2 Building a Sound System���������������������������������� (pg. 82)
4.3 Common Phonological Processes���������������������������������������� (pg. 85)
4.4 Accounting for Patterns: Phonological Rules���������������������������������������������������� (pg. 90)
4.5 Accounting for Patterns: Constraints����������������������������������������������� (pg. 94)
4.6 Summary������������������ (pg. 98)
4.7 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 99)
4.8 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 99)
4.9 References��������������������� (pg. 101)
III. Module 3: Word Meaning and Word Structure (pg. 103)
5. Word Learning (pg. 105)
5.1 Characteristics of Early Word Production��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 105)
5.2 The Problems of Word Learning, and the Limitations of Ostension����������������������������������������������� (pg. 111)
5.3 Principles That Guide Word Learning���������������������������������������������� (pg. 116)
5.4 Learning Verbs via Syntactic Bootstrapping����������������������������������������������������& (pg. 120)
5.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 128)
5.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 129)
5.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 129)
5.8 References��������������������� (pg. 131)
6. The Acquisition of Morphology (pg. 135)
6.0 Introduction����������������������� (pg. 135)
6.1 The Foundation: Roger Brown�������������������������������������� (pg. 137)
6.2 Acquisition of a Rule, or Memorized Chunk: Jean Berko (Gleason) (pg. 143)
6.3 General Properties of the Acquisition of Inflection�������������������������������������������������� (pg. 145)
6.4 The Role of Input���������������������������� (pg. 153)
6.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 155)
6.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 155)
6.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 155)
6.8 References��������������������� (pg. 157)
IV. Module 4: The Sentence Level (pg. 165)
7. Syntactic Development (pg. 167)
7.0 Introduction����������������������� (pg. 167)
7.1 Bootstrapping into Syntax: Semantic Bootstrapping��������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 167)
7.2 Functional Structure and Optional Infinitives���������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 170)
7.3 Other Aspects of Functional Structure������������������������������������������������ (pg. 190)
7.4 The Problem of Variable Reference�������������������������������������������� (pg. 203)
7.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 216)
7.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 217)
7.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 217)
7.8 References��������������������� (pg. 218)
V. Module 5: Beyond Monolingual and Typical Language Acquisition (pg. 223)
8. Language Acquisition under Nontypical Circumstances (pg. 225)
8.1 Late First-Language Acquisition (pg. 225)
8.2 Language Acquisition in Deaf Children������������������������������������������������ (pg. 232)
8.3 Language Acquisition in Blind Children������������������������������������������������� (pg. 242)
8.4 Impaired Language Acquisition���������������������������������������� (pg. 245)
8.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 256)
8.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 256)
8.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 256)
8.8 References��������������������� (pg. 259)
9. Acquisition of More than One Language (pg. 265)
9.0 Introduction����������������������� (pg. 265)
9.1 Bilingualism in Early Childhood: Simultaneous Bilingualism������������������������������������������������& (pg. 266)
9.2 Successive Bilingual Acquisition������������������������������������������� (pg. 274)
9.3 Language Attrition and Heritage Language��������������������������������������������������� (pg. 275)
9.4 Language Endangerment and Language Revitalization��������������������������������������������������&# (pg. 278)
9.5 Summary������������������ (pg. 284)
9.6 Further Reading�������������������������� (pg. 285)
9.7 Exercises�������������������� (pg. 285)
9.8 References��������������������� (pg. 286)
Appendix A: English IPA Symbols (pg. 289)
Appendix B: Methods in Child Language Acquisition (pg. 293)
Introduction������������������� (pg. 293)
Module 1: Naturalistic Data���������������������������������� (pg. 293)
What Is Naturalistic Data? (pg. 294)
How Naturalistic Data Is Collected����������������������������������������� (pg. 295)
Module 2: Production Data�������������������������������� (pg. 296)
Elicited Production�������������������������� (pg. 296)
Elicited Imitation������������������������� (pg. 298)
Priming�������������� (pg. 299)
Module 3: Comprehension Data����������������������������������� (pg. 300)
Grammaticality/Acceptability Judgment�������������������������������������������� (pg. 300)
Truth Value Judgment Task (TVJT) (pg. 301)
Picture Selection������������������������ (pg. 303)
Intermodal Preferential Looking Paradigm / Eye Tracking�������������������������������������������������� (pg. 304)
Act Out Task������������������� (pg. 306)
Methodologies for Infant Studies��������������������������������������� (pg. 307)
Brain-Based Methods (pg. 309)
Further Reading���������������������� (pg. 310)
References����������������� (pg. 310)
Notes (pg. 313)
Chapter 1 (pg. 313)
Chapter 2 (pg. 313)
Chapter 3 (pg. 313)
Chapter 4 (pg. 314)
Chapter 5 (pg. 314)
Chapter 6 (pg. 314)
Chapter 7 (pg. 315)
Chapter 8 (pg. 315)
Chapter 9 (pg. 316)
Index (pg. 317)

Misha Becker Becker

Misha Becker is Professor of Linguistics at the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill.

Kamil Ud Deen Deen

Kamil Ud Deen is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.

eTextbook
Go paperless today! Available online anytime, nothing to download or install.

Features

  • Bookmarking
  • Note taking
  • Highlighting